Stand-Alone CF Document

                                                                                                                       

 

The Conceptual Framework

Undergirding Professional Education Programs

at LaGrange College

 

LaGrange College offers several professional education programs.  These include a preservice B.A. Program in Early Childhood Education; preservice MAT Programs in Middle Grades Education and five content areas of Secondary Education (mathematics, English, history, biology, and broad field science); and an M.Ed. Program in Curriculum and Instruction for experienced teachers.   

 

Development of the Conceptual Framework undergirding these professional education programs began in 1999-2000 when a committee of three faculty members initially conceived it.  After attending a conference on conceptual frameworks, they looked at the conceptual frameworks developed by other colleges, and they reviewed standards, current research, and educational texts and journals, with a particular focus on the text Enhancing Professional Practice: A Framework for Teaching by Charlotte Danielson (1996).  In addition to their individual research, these three faculty members met often and shared key ideas relevant to the direction and focus of the Education Department, its mission, and the mission of the College.  Central to their initial draft of a Conceptual Framework were three core tenets (Enthusiastic Engagement in Learning, Exemplary Teaching Practices, and Caring and Supportive Classrooms and Communities) and the 10 INTASC principles for beginning teachers.  The Conceptual Framework was subsequently approved by faculty in the department.

 

Prior to the GA PSC accreditation visit in fall 2005, faculty in the unit formally reviewed the current version of the Conceptual Framework and made several changes to strengthen their commitment to diversity, technology, professional and state standards, and candidate performance in terms of desired professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions.  They retained the original three core tenets, but they also elaborated on each by combining the 10 INTASC principles with the current standards and Georgia Systemic Teacher Education Program (GSTEP) frameworks promulgated by the GA PSC in order to identify clusters of competencies related to each of the three core tenets.  They also updated the knowledge base undergirding each tenet and the references cited in each knowledge base.

 

In preparation for the GA PSC accreditation visit in fall 2007, the Conceptual Framework was reviewed by a special ad hoc group of school district leaders, teachers, supervising faculty, alumni, and current undergraduate and graduate candidates who convened in May 2007 to re-examine the Conceptual Framework and recommend and suggested changes or refinements.  This group of stakeholders reaffirmed the values and commitments described in the current Conceptual Framework. 


The LaGrange College Conceptual Framework

 

The Conceptual Framework undergirding professional education programs at LaGrange College is derived from the mission of the College, the mission of its Education Department, state and national standards, and the professional judgment of those members of the College community who are involved in teacher education programs at both Initial (preservice) and Advanced (inservice) levels. 

 

The Conceptual Framework has three core tenets.  Each tenet has both a knowledge base that draws on relevant theory, research, and best practices and clusters of related competencies that candidates are expected to develop during their programs.  Each of these clusters of related competencies has implications for the curriculum delivered in each program.

 

In addition, three kinds of alignment characterize the Conceptual Framework.  First, the three core tenets and their related competencies are aligned with state and national standards for teachers.  Second, courses in programs are clearly aligned with the Conceptual Framework tenets and competencies.  And third, the unit’s eight key candidate performance assessments in Initial teacher education programs are also clearly aligned with the Conceptual Framework tenets and competencies.

 

The Mission of LaGrange College

 

Based upon a foundation of liberal arts in a Christian context, the mission of LaGrange College is “to inspire the soul and challenge the mind in a caring and ethical community.”

 

The Mission of the Education Department

 

Reflecting the mission of the College, the mission of the Education Department is to affirm the goals of civility, diversity, service, and excellence by developing caring and supportive classrooms and communities that foster enthusiastic engagement in learning and exemplary teaching practices.  More specifically, the mission of the Department is to develop and nurture teachers who have both a strong foundation in the liberal arts and essential knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions regarding both content and pedagogy.

 

The Conceptual Framework Tenets, Knowledge Bases,

Clusters of Related Competencies, and Implications for Curriculum

 

The Conceptual Framework has three core tenets—one focused on candidates’ professional knowledge, a second focused on their professional skills, and a third focused on their professional dispositions.  Each tenet has a supporting knowledge base of relevant theory, research, and best practices and a cluster of related competencies that candidates are expected to develop or enhance as they complete (1) the College’s core curriculum if they are undergraduate students and (2) professional education courses and field experiences at either undergraduate or graduate levels.  Each cluster of competencies also has implications for program curriculum and its delivery. 

 

 

Tenet 1:  Enthusiastic Engagement in Learning

 

This first tenet of the Conceptual Framework is its “professional knowledge tenet.”

 

Undergirding Knowledge Base.  The guiding philosophy of teacher education programs in LaGrange College at both Initial (preservice) and Advanced (inservice) levels is social constructivism, a theoretical base from which teacher education candidates learn how to be critical educators who can create learning environments in which learning is both enjoyable and rigorous.  Learning in such an environment requires teachers to be learning facilitators, rather than lecturers or dispensers of information, and it requires them to organize, manage, and create learning environments in which students can be actively involved in the teaching and learning process (Tomlinson, 2001).  Ranier and Guyton (2001) suggest that, when teacher educators implement the principles of constructivism in their teacher preparation programs, they transform their candidates and stimulate them to develop their own personal understandings of constructivism.  Candidates who are taught in non-constructivist classrooms are not likely to create constructivist classrooms in their own teaching. 

 

Although there is widespread agreement among educators that learning is most effective when knowledge is constructed, the field of education has different perspectives about which disciplines, pedagogical approaches, philosophies, and social theories ought to be privileged in the curriculum (Phillips, 1995).  Teacher education programs at LaGrange embrace the perspective that knowledge is constructed in a context of social relations which affirm that, because no one person has the same experiences, there are multiple ways to view the world.  Moreover, while all knowledge begins with experience, not all knowledge can be adequately constructed without understanding the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of various disciplines.  From exposure to different disciplines in the liberal arts and sciences—a core curriculum—candidates acquire a foundation for scaffolding new information.  Moreover, once they have a knowledge base in the disciplines, they can derive content and subject matter from these disciplines that will benefit P-12 learners.

 

For candidates in the department’s Initial programs, developing knowledge in the disciplines is a major goal of both their core courses and their courses in a major.  For candidates in the department’s Advanced program, increasing their knowledge of learners, curriculum, and pedagogy is a major goal.

 

Gail McCutcheon’s (1995) discussion of Schwab’s “common places” is particularly helpful, because it explains how content, curriculum, and learners provide a context for teacher preparation.  Subject matter, which we refer to as content, is more than knowledge gleaned from disciplines.  It also involves the development of cognitive processes that stimulate the growth of self and facilitate service to others.  Learners, of course, are our candidates.  Knowing their abilities, interests, and needs, as well as their strengths and limitations, is critical to our providing them with a meaningful curriculum.  And milieus are the contexts that candidates bring to us—their communities and their cultures.  How these “common places” interact in a teacher education program dramatically affects the success of that program. 

 

 

Related Candidate Competencies.  There are three clusters of candidate competencies related to this first “professional knowledge tenet”:

 

Competency Cluster 1.1:  Knowledge of Content

 

Implications for Program Curriculum:  Content is presented to our undergraduate students through a diverse network of core courses and coursework in a major field or discipline.  Each MAT or M.Ed. candidate enters our teacher education program with a strong knowledge of subject matter, as can be seen by the degrees obtained and the transcripts of prior undergraduate coursework.  Our program takes this content knowledge one step further and offers candidates the pedagogical knowledge and theoretical constructs specific to educational practice.

 

Competency Cluster 1.2:  Knowledge of Curriculum

 

Implications for Program Curriculum:  From the Latin root “currere,” curriculum literally means “to run the racecourse.”  To do this successfully requires a broad understanding of curriculum as active investigation of the natural and social worlds.  Because curriculum extends beyond planning, instruction, and assessment to embrace philosophical, cultural, economic, and political implications of learning and schooling, this concept is addressed in terms of stimulating enthusiastic engagement in learning among both candidates and students.

 

Competency Cluster 1.3:  Knowledge of Learners

 

Implications for Program Curriculum:  To teach a diverse community of learners successfully, candidates need to take a holistic approach to understanding learners through a wide array of curriculum inputs.  Not only do these experiences explore the cognitive, social, emotional, and physical experiences of individual children, but they also emphasize how the culture, ethnicity, and language of learners affect pedagogy.

 

 

Tenet 2:  Exemplary Professional Teaching Practices

 

This second tenet of the Conceptual Framework is its “professional skills tenet.”

 

Undergirding Knowledge Base.  This second tenet focuses on the professional skills that teachers need in order to be competent in the classroom.  This does not mean that we believe teaching can be reduced to a monolithic form of training.  On the contrary, an exemplary practitioner draws from multiple resources in order to teach in diverse classrooms.  We believe, therefore, that, in this age of accountability, candidates must have a large repertoire of skills to plan, deliver, and assess instruction.

 

Because teacher preparation involves much more than simply knowing how to deliver instruction efficiently, we do not limit the curriculum in programs to a particular set of specific teaching techniques.  Rather, we try to be attentive to the purposes of instruction.  Moreover, because we do not view students as context-free individuals, independent of time, culture, and condition (Cannella, 1998), we believe that teachers must link the life histories of their students to the content taught in classrooms, so that their students can make deep, meaningful personal connections (Delpit, 1995; Kincheloe, 2005).  To develop these linkages as candidates learn how to plan, deliver, and assess instruction, we focus candidates on interrelationships between society and its institutions on one hand and issues of race, ethnicity, gender, and social class on the other. 

 

We believe that learning is mostly an affective, dramatic, and emotional event and that it requires learners to construct new connections.  Fundamental to social constructivism, learning that is first taught at the conceptual level in the classroom must be transferred to situations outside the classroom (Fosnot and Perry, 2005).  This requires that learners be active participants in the learning process. 

 

We also believe that, while constructivism is not a prescriptive theory for curriculum, there are certain strategies that promote the creation of active learning environments.  What seems to work best are methods that are cooperative and collaborative in nature and that are characterized by differentiated instruction, since all students do not learn in the same way or at the same rate.  By offering instructional choices, teachers allow students to use learning styles that work best for them. 

 

Differentiated instruction begins with assessment of students’ prior knowledge and experience and offers students multiple approaches to learning, e.g., presentations, projects, reciprocal teaching, discussion, aesthetic experiences, peer teaching, cooperative learning, and reflective writing that stimulates them to summarize and analyze their learning.  Students assume increasing responsibility for the knowledge, skills, and dispositions they develop (Tomlinson, 1999).  And, as they reflect upon their learning, students examine their feelings about concepts, pursue solutions to problems, and develop constructive habits, attitudes, and dispositions for future learning (Simpson, 2006).

 

We further believe that developing a productive classroom community and encouraging positive student behaviors are inextricably linked (Kohn, 1996).  Appropriate behaviors are more likely to occur when instruction is well planned and delivered in democratic classroom communities that respect individual freedom, personal justice, and equality, while at the same time teaching students about the welfare and interests of others (Gathercoal, 1993; Simpson, 2006).  Because democratic approaches to teaching reflect the philosophy of a teacher, we want candidates to trust their students to make their own decisions in student-centered classrooms (Moorman and Moorman, 1989).  The ultimate goal of constructivist teaching is to create classrooms that become laboratories for democracy in which well-planned instruction is delivered and assessed in a student-centered climate (McEwan, 1996; Kincheloe, 2005).

 

As Ranier (1999) concedes, there are formidable barriers to teaching in the constructivist mode, because power relationships in schools do not always support this approach to teaching.  Because there are today specific content and testing requirements associated with each grade level, a teacher’s chosen instructional philosophy and instructional strategies must satisfy these specific content knowledge and testing expectations.  Seemingly at odds with these required outcomes, constructivist teaching places substantial value on the personal meaning that a learner gleans from a learning experience.  This is our challenge as teachers:  To apply constructivist principles, while simultaneously meeting the content and testing requirements of state departments of education and local school boards. 

 

Rather than beginning the instructional planning process with questions like, “How do we best cover the topic?” or “What learning experience should we have today?” Wiggins and McTighe (2001) suggest “a backwards curricular design.”  That is, they suggest that one begin at the end of the process by identifying, first, the desired goals and standards to be achieved by a lesson and, then, the specific evidence that will show that the goals and standards have been achieved, before planning the instruction that will be used to reach those goals and standards.  In “backwards curricular design,” one must think, first, like an assessor and, then, like a curriculum planner.

 

Related Candidate Competencies.  There are three clusters of candidate competencies related to this second “professional skills tenet”:

 

Competency Cluster 2.1:  Planning Skills

 

Implications for Program Curriculum:  Planning skills are developed in courses that emphasize the value of preparing instruction that is based on accepted best practices and theoretical research.  When candidates present students with well-prepared learning activities, students achieve more, because they are actively engaged in pleasurable and meaningful learning processes.  Solid preparation by candidates before instruction not only increases student achievement, but it also reduces inappropriate classroom behaviors.

 

Competency Cluster 2.2:  Instructional Skills

 

Implications for Program Curriculum:  Developing instructional skills that are based on constructivist teaching principles emphasize the need to teach for conceptual understanding, before content information is presented to learners.  Once conceptual understanding has been achieved, learners become more receptive to new information that is scaffolded upon prior knowledge.  At the same time, this new knowledge must be applied in meaningful ways to ensure transference to other situations outside the classroom.  Thus, we advocate differentiated instructional processes that begin with teaching for conceptual understanding, move to presentation of new knowledge, and then give learners an extended period during which they can apply this new information in active, meaningful, and cooperative ways.  Furthermore, learning experiences in each program curriculum are designed to promote critical thinking, meet the diverse needs of students, and integrate technology in instruction.

 

Competency Cluster 2.3  Assessment Skills

 

Implications for Program Curriculum:  Assessment skills are an essential element of exemplary instruction.  Because learners can show what they have learned in many ways, it is important that teachers use multiple measures and a variety of formal and informal techniques to assess learning.  Not only is it necessary for teachers to assess what students have learned, but it is equally important for them to assess the effectiveness of their planning and instructional processes.  This is why we provide many opportunities for candidates to reflect upon their instructional practices and think about appropriate ways to assess learning.

 

 

 

Tenet 3:  Caring and Supportive Classrooms and Learning Communities

 

This third tenet of the Conceptual Framework is its “professional dispositions tenet.”

 

Undergriding Knowledge Base.  This third tenet focuses on the professional dispositions that teachers need to develop and demonstrate in their work with students, families, professional colleagues, and members of the larger community.  Creating caring and supportive classrooms and learning communities requires that teachers reflect on their professional responsibilities, make connections with others, and take actions thoughtfully and carefully to benefit students and enhance their learning.  If candidates do not take action to improve the lives of children and communities, their own transformation does not occur.  By contrast, through action research, positive classroom practices, and on-going research in school communities, candidates can affect policies and practices around them.  As they participate in these experiences, they are challenged to view the world through anti-racist, multicultural, non-gender biased lenses and to advocate for social justice and equality (McLaren, 1998). 

 

Because he thought that the greatest safeguard for democracy was a thinking population, John Dewey believed that our collective judgment would become more reasoned through reflection (Simpson, 2006).  A reflective thinker questions asserted truths and values with an open mind, considers new or alternative ideas, and routinely examines beliefs and thoughts.  Applying rationality to his or her world, a reflective thinker confronts biases, not necessarily to eliminate them, but to place them in a context of different social, cultural, philosophical, and theoretical positions (Kincheloe, 2005).  Dewey also asserted teachers who deserve the highest praise are those whose students have intellectual awakenings, develop the power to think, can face facts, and have developed “habits of doubt” through reflection (Simpson, 2006). 

 

Jenlink and Jenlink (2005) recommend that, in order for teachers and candidates to become public intellectuals, they must first learn to become self-critical practitioners who use research in their teaching and who reflect on their own autobiographical journey in a context of history, politics, and culture.  The requisite critical disposition for teaching is social activism.  As Jenlink and Jenlink assert, “teacher education programs are charged with the public responsibility to educate teachers who will enable future generations to learn the knowledge and skills necessary to address social inequities and injustices, while working to build a principled and democratic society” (p. 15).

 

In Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Paulo Freire (2002) asks teacher educators to take actions that will overcome injustice and inequities that hinder the development of children.  He calls upon us to promote cooperation, rather than competition, liberty for all, unity among working people, genuinely democratic organizations, and a harmonious blending of cultures.  Our culture, he argues, is a construct that encompasses the political, social, racial, gender, linguistic, ethical, and economic aspects of the human condition.  It is a discourse that often does not benefit all children, particularly those who are poor or who are members of marginalized groups.  At LaGrange, we believe that our teacher education candidates, not only can change the world, but have both a right and an obligation to do so. 

 

Related Candidate Competencies.  There are three clusters of candidate competencies related to this third “professional dispositions tenet”:

 

Competency Cluster 3.1:  Reflection

 

Implications for Program Curriculum:  Reflection involves writing and discussing feelings about classroom, school, and community experiences.  The process is also important when it comes to thinking about how to modify teaching to improve students’ work and increase their achievement.  This reflective process includes, but is not limited to, anecdotal records, regular writing assignments about teaching experiences, and reactions to articles and books.

 

Competency Cluster 3.2:  Connections

 

Implications for Program Curriculum:  Connections are made between people in schools and communities, as well as with literature and scholarly research.  Collaboration with schools and community stakeholders is a necessary ingredient for success as a teacher.  Teachers must be visible in order to make positive contributions to a greater community.  Connections are made when teachers share knowledge from journals and books with colleagues and community stakeholders.  Connections are also made when teachers present and publish original research that addresses a wide range of topics, from innovations in teaching techniques to analyses of educational policy.

 

Competency Cluster 3.3:  Action

 

Implications for Program Curriculum:  Reflecting and making connections creates opportunities for teachers to take action.  This can involve writing and speaking to colleagues and stakeholders about curricular issues and educational policies.  It can also include volunteering and joining advocacy groups and professional associations that use the collective voice of their members to effect positive change in schools and in the lives of children, parents, and communities.


Alignment of the Conceptual Framework Tenets and Related Competencies

with State and National Standards, Courses in Programs,

and Key Assessments in Initial Programs

 

Table CF-1 describes how the three Conceptual Framework tenets and their related clusters of competencies align with the following state and national standards:

 

 

Table CF-2 describes how courses in the unit’s Initial B.A. program in early childhood education, its Initial MAT programs in middle grades and secondary education, and its Advanced M.Ed. program in curriculum and instruction align with the three Conceptual Framework tenets and their related clusters of competencies.

 

Table CF-3 describes how the eight key candidate performance assessments in Initial programs align with the three Conceptual Framework tenets and their related clusters of competencies.


Table CF-1

Alignment of the Conceptual Framework Tenets and Their Related Competencies

with State and National Standards

 

 

 

The LaGrange College

Conceptual Framework Tenets

and Their Clusters of Related Competencies

Six Domains

of the Georgia

Framework

for Teaching

Five Elements

of NCATE 2000

Standard 1

for Initial Programs

Ten INTASC

Principles for

Beginning

Teachers

Five NBPTS

Core

Propositions

for Experienced

Teachers

Tenet 1:  Enthusiastic Engagement in Learning (Professional Knowledge)

 

1.1   Knowledge of Content

1.2   Knowledge of Curriculum

1.3   Knowledge of Learners

 

 

 

 

1

1, 2

2

 

 

 

1A

1B, 1C

1C

 

 

 

1

1

2,3

 

 

 

2

2

1

Tenet 2:  Exemplary Professional Teaching Practices (Professional Skills)

 

2.1   Planning Skills

2.2   Instructional Skills

2.3   Assessment Skills

 

 

 

 

3

3, 5

4, 5

 

 

 

1C

1C

1D

 

 

 

4,7

4,5,6

8

 

 

 

2,3

2

3

Tenet 3:  Caring and Supportive Classrooms and Learning Communities (Professional Dispositions)

 

3.1   Reflection

3.2   Connections

3.3   Action

 

 

 

 

 

5, 6

3, 6

5, 6

 

 

 

 

1D, 1G

1G

1G

 

 

 

 

9

10

9

 

 

 

 

4

5

4

 

 

 

Six Domains of the Georgia Framework for Teaching

 

Domain 1:  Content and Curriculum:  Teachers demonstrate a strong knowledge of content area(s) appropriate for their certification levels

Domain 2:  Knowledge of Students and Their Learning:  Teachers support the intellectual, social, physical, and personal development of all students

Domain 3:  Learning Environments:  Teachers create learning environments that encourage positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation

Domain 4:  Assessment:  Teachers understand and use a range of formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the continuous development of all learners

Domain 5:  Planning and Instruction:  Teachers design and create instructional experiences based on their knowledge of content and curriculum, students, learning environments, and assessments

Domain 6:  Professionalism:  Teachers recognize, participate in, and contribute to teaching as a profession.

 

 

Five Elements of NCATE 2000 Standard 1 for Initial Programs

 

Element 1A.:  Content Knowledge for Teacher Candidates

Element 1B.:  Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Skills for Teacher Candidates

Element 1C.:  Professional and Pedagogical Knowledge and Skills for Teacher Candidates

Element 1D.:  Student Learning for Teacher Candidates

Element 1G.:  Professional Dispositions for All Candidates

.

 

Ten INTASC Principles for Beginning Teachers

 

Principle 1:  The teachers understands essential concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and can create learning experiences that make these aspects of subject matter meaningful for students (Knowledge of Subject Matter)

Principle 2:  The teacher understands how children learn and develop, and can provide learning opportunities that support their intellectual, social, and personal development (Child Development and Learning)

Principle 3:  The teacher understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adaptive to diverse learners (Diverse Learners)

Principle 4:  The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage students’ development of critical thinking, problem-solving, and performance skills (Multiple Instructional Strategies)

Principle 5:  The teacher uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation (Learner Motivation and Behavior)

Principle 6:  The teacher uses knowledge of verbal, nonverbal, and media communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom (Inquiry, Collaboration, and Supportive Interaction)

Principle 7:  The teacher plans instruction based upon knowledge of subject matter, students, the community, and curriculum goals (Instructional Planning)

Principle 8:  The teacher understands and uses formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual, social, and physical development of the learner (Assessment Strategies)

Principle 9:  The teacher is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of his/her choices and actions on others (students, parents, and other professionals in the learning community) and who actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally (Professional Behaviors)

Principle 10:  The teacher fosters relationships with school colleagues, parents, and agencies in the larger community to support students’ learning and well-being (External Relationships).

 

Five NBPTS Core Propositions for Experienced Teachers

 

Proposition 1:  Teachers are committed to students and learning

Proposition 2:  Teachers know the subjects they teach and how to teach those subjects to students

Proposition 3:  Teachers are responsible for managing and monitoring student learning

Proposition 4:  Teachers think systematically about their practice and learn from experience

Proposition 5:  Teachers are members of learning communities.

 


Table CF-2

Alignment of Courses in Programs

with the Conceptual Framework Tenets and Their Related Competencies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Courses in Programs

Attention to Conceptual Framework Tenets

and Their Clusters of Related Competencies

(I) Introduced     (D) Developed      (P) Practiced

1.0  Enthusiastic

Engagement

in Learning

 

 

 

Knowledge of:

1.1: Content

1.2: Curriculum

1.3: Learners

2.0  Exemplary

Professional

Teaching

Practices

 

 

Skills of:

2.1: Planning

2.2: Instruction

2.3: Assessment

3.0  Caring and

Supportive

Classrooms

and Learning

Communities

 

Dispositions of:

3.1: Reflection

3.2: Connections

3.3: Action

1.1

1.2

1.3

2.1

2.2

2.3

3.1

3.2

3.3

The B.A. Program

in Early Childhood Education

 

EDUC 1199: Foundations of Education

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

 

EDUC 3317: Science Methods

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

 

EDUC 3319: Math Methods

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

 

EDUC 3342: Child Development Practicum

D

 

D

I

I

I

D

D

 

EDUC 3354: Theories of Reading Instruction

I

I

I

I

I

I

D

I

 

EDUC 3355: Fundamentals of Reading Instruction

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

 

 

EDUC 3356: Integrating Specialty Areas

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

 

EDUC 4356: Diagnosis and Remediation of

Problems in Reading

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

 

EDUC 4360: Curriculum and Accountability

in the Elementary Grades

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

 

EDUC 4449: Classroom Technology for

Elementary Education

D

D

 

D

 

I

D

 

 

EDUC 4456: Language Arts Methods

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

 

EDUC 4457: Social Studies Methods

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

 

EDUC 4459: Special Needs/Exceptional Child

I

D

D

D

D

I

 

D

 

EDUC 4460: Diversity in Elementary Grades

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

 

EDUC 4480: Senior Seminar

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

I

I

EDUC 4490E: Early Childhood Student Teaching

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MAT Programs in Middle Grades

and Secondary Education

 

EDUC 5020: Methods, Teaching, and Learning

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

I

 

EDUC 5030: Research in Secondary

Curriculum and Instruction

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

EDUC 5040: Affirming Diversity in the Classroom

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

 

EDUC 5060: Secondary Students with

Special Needs

I

D

D

D

D

I

 

D

 

EDUC 5700: Internship I

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

I

 

 

 

 

 

 

Courses in Programs

Attention to Conceptual Framework Tenets

and Their Clusters of Related Competencies

(I) Introduced     (D) Developed      (P) Practiced

1.0  Enthusiastic

Engagement

in Learning

 

 

 

Knowledge of:

1.1: Content

1.2: Curriculum

1.3: Learners

2.0  Exemplary

Professional

Teaching

Practices

 

 

Skills of:

2.1: Planning

2.2: Instruction

2.3: Assessment

3.0  Caring and

Supportive

Classrooms

and Learning

Communities

 

Dispositions of:

3.1: Reflection

3.2: Connections

3.3: Action

1.1

1.2

1.3

2.1

2.2

2.3

3.1

3.2

3.3

EDUC 5700: Internship II

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

EDUC 6010: Assessment and Accountability

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

 

 

EDUC 6020: Educational Technology

D

D

 

D

 

D

D

 

 

EDUC 6040: Foundations of Curriculum and

Instruction

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

 

 

Reading Concentration:

EDUC 5050: Affirming Diversity: Tchg Reading

EDUC 5070: Assessing and Improving Literacy

EDUC 5080: Essentials of Adolescent Literature

EDUC XXX: Foundations of Reading Theories

EDUC 6030: Problems in Reading

 

D

D

D

I

D

 

D

D

D

D

D

 

D

D

D

D

D

 

D

D

D

D

D

 

D

D

D

D

D

 

D

D

D

I

D

 

D

D

D

D

D

 

I

 

D

D

 

 

I

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

M.Ed. Program in Curriculum and

Instruction

 

EDUC 6010: Assessment and Accountability

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

 

 

EDUC 6030: Problems in Reading

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

 

 

EDUC 6045: Curriculum Studies

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

P

P

EDUC 6100: Theories of Constructivist Learning

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

P

P

EDUC 6200: Directed Research

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

EDUC 6060: Literature Across the Curriculum

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

P

P

EDUC 6070: School Law and Contemporary

Issues in Curriculum and Instruction

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

P

P

EDUC 6080: Differentiated Instruction and

Student Diversity

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

P

P

EDUC 6300: Thesis Defense Seminar

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

EDUC 6090: Research and Project Presentation

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Table CF-3

Alignment of Key Assessments in Initial Programs

with the Conceptual Framework Tenets and Their Related Competencies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Key Assessments in Initial Programs

Aligned with Conceptual Framework Tenets

and Their Clusters of Related Competencies

1.0  Enthusiastic

Engagement

in Learning

 

 

 

Knowledge of:

1.1: Content

1.2: Curriculum

1.3: Learners

2.0  Exemplary

Professional

Teaching

Practices

 

 

Skills of:

2.1: Planning

2.2: Instruction

2.3: Assessment

3.0  Caring and

Supportive

Classrooms

and Learning

Communities

 

Dispositions of:

3.1: Reflection

3.2: Connections

3.3: Action

1.1

1.2

1.3

2.1

2.2

2.3

3.1

3.2

3.3

 

Two Standardized State Examinations

·         GACE Basic Skills Test

·         GACE Content Test

 

 

 

X

X

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Four Comprehensive Exit Examinations (CEEs)

 

 

X

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Lesson Plan Evaluation Instrument (LPEI)

 

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

 

 

The Professional Dispositions Evaluation (PDE)

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

The Teaching Performance Observation

Instrument (TPOI)

 

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

The Professional Teaching Portfolio (PTP)

 

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

 

 

The Teacher Work Sample (TWS)

 

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

 

 

 

The First-Year Survey (FYS) of Graduates

and Their Principals

 

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

 

X

 

X

 

 


References

 

 

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Delpit, L. ( 1995). Other people’s children: Cultural conflict in the classroom. New York: The New Press.

 

Fosnot, C., & Perry, R. (2005) Constructivism: A psychological theory of learning. In Catherine Twomey (Ed.), Constructivism: Theory, perspectives and practice (pp. 8-38). New York: Teachers College Press. 

 

Freire, P. (2002). Pedagogy of the oppressed. New York: Continuum. 

 

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Moorman C., & Moorman, N. (1989). Teacher talk: What it really means. Bay City, MI: Institute for Personal Power.

 

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Simpson. D. (2006). John Dewey. New York: Peter Lang. 

 

Tomlinson, C. (2001). How to differentiate instruction in mixed-ability classrooms. Alexandria, VA: Association of Supervision and Curriculum Development.

 

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